Why should you ditch Google?

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Courtesy of Neon Tommy

Did you know you can change the ecosphere by changing your web search engine?

In a world where the West is demonstrably lazy, changing your search engine to ‘Ecosia’ is evidently the easiest method of reducing CO2 and the chance of sinking cities through rising sea levels.

Ecosia is a small German based corporation that aims to help prevent climate change by planting trees. It’s a search engine that generates ad revenue and donates their income to tree planting programs across the globe. Just like Google, you search on their website and sponsors pay to appear at the top of the list. Unlike Google, it’s positively changing nature and the world we live in. To date, I have planted 430 trees in just two months, without lifting a finger – just a mere stretch on the keyboard!

Potential problems:

  • You must click on the ads to generate revenue to plant trees. Although this is a problem for those that avidly avoid ads, the very usage of Ecosia increases the chance that you won’t have to. The more people that use Ecosia, the greater the appeal for advertisers and so the more likely an ad will be relevant to your interests (insomuch that you won’t avoid the very thing you need).
  • Google is the most accurate search engine available. This is undeniable, but Ecosia is not below-par. And unless you rely on the accuracy of search engines, then you do not need Google. If you’re looking for a specific item, it is likely to appear on the search. If you are not, then relevant material will appear on the first page, or at worst simply further down the page. Personally, I think a longer scroll is a fair substitution for saving the planet.
  • This is another corrupt money-making charity. What’s fantastic about Ecosia is their transparency. They publish a monthly financial report detailing the statistical breakdown of their revenue and how it is used. They’re even more scrupulous as they detail the partners that are funded and how they use the revenue. From the click of an ad to the nourishing of a seed, your efforts are recognised in real-time.

I cannot comprehend the ease. But this laid-back tactic is not unheard of. Think back to the most recent “night out” that ended at McDonalds. If you paid by cash, you are likely to have donated your penny change to the Ronald McDonald charity box, from the endless food items ending their cost with 9 pence. Being charitable was easy. If YouTube/Google even donated a fraction of their ad revenue, we could nearly justify patting ourselves on the back for online procrastinating.

More corporations should follow. Charity doesn’t have to be hard; they should abuse our ability to be lazy but willing.